Posted in All Book Reviews, Crime fiction, Mystery, Thrillers

Book Review: No One Home (By Tim Weaver)

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Published in 2019, No One Home is one of the most recent books in the David Raker series. The next full-length novel in the series, The Blackbird, comes out mid-2022. (You can pre-order that one here.) Between these two, Tim Weaver published one standalone thriller – Missing Pieces – and one collection of short stories featuring David Raker – The Shadow at the Door.

The reason I bring all of this up is that when I realized I was almost completely caught up and would now have to wait months and years for the next installment in the series, I was both happy and sad. But if you haven’t read any of Tim Weaver’s books yet, or if you’ve just read a few here and there, I would really recommend reading the entire series, and starting from the first one. The David Raker series remains one that meets the bar almost every time.

Genre: 

Thriller

Length: 

400 pages

Blurb:

The village of Black Gale has four homes and nine residents. On Halloween night, they meet at one of the houses for dinner. Photos of the night show them happy – drinks and smiles all around. Then, none of them are ever seen again. Two and a half years later, the police still have no clue about what happened to the entire village, and the media focus has died down. So the families of the missing people turn to David Raker. And Raker makes their obsession his own. With every case, David Raker has been moving closer to his own destruction. He knows this truth. He accepts it. But nothing could have prepared him for the mystery of Black Gale.

Overall Rating:

9 out of 10 stars

Plot:

10 out of 10 stars

Characterization:

10 out of 10 stars

Primary Element:

10 out of 10 for its thrill

Writing Style:

10 out of 10 stars

Part of a Series: 

Yep, this is Book #10 in the David Raker series. I wouldn’t really recommend reading it as a standalone. After around Book #5, they’ve become more and more connected, and you’re likely to have spoilers for the prequels if you read them out of order.

Highlighted Takeaway:

An unconventional mystery, supported by numerous characters that are all shades of gray, and enhanced through its perfect setting.

What I Liked:

No One Home has two stories running simultaneously, far apart in setting and time. Both are interesting, and both have their own protagonists. This dual approach is incredibly engaging.

Then there is also the fact that, as with previous works, David Raker’s character grows more and more with every successive novel. And #10 in the series has some of the most interesting character development yet. Never before has the series had you so concerned.

What I Didn’t Like:

I didn’t really find much to dislike. Quite a few twists and turns that keep you guessing right up until the end.

Who Should Read It:

If you’ve read and enjoyed even one of the David Raker books, I’d recommend giving the entire series a read. And if you haven’t read anything by Tim Weaver as yet but enjoy thrillers, mysteries, and crime fiction, especially those with gritty settings, then I’d highly recommend this series.

Who Should Avoid:

If you don’t enjoy crime fiction that focuses on cold cases or that can become a bit dark, I’d recommend avoiding this one.

Read It For:

Some shocking developments in David Raker’s story arc, and interesting ones in those of other favorite characters.

Unsurprisingly, I actually ended up reading The Shadow at the Door, which is set after the events of No One Home. Its review will be up soon but before that will be the review of Simone St. James’ most recent book. You might have heard of this one if you like the crime and thriller genres, especially true crime. Stay tuned!

Got something to share about Tim Weaver, David Raker, or other books? Or just want to say hi? Drop a comment below!

And as always, thank you for stopping at The Book Review Station and reading this review.

– Rishika

Posted in All Book Reviews, Crime fiction, Mystery, Thrillers

Book Review: You Were Gone (By Tim Weaver)

If you’ve been reading the last few reviews on this site, you would’ve noticed that Tim Weaver’s name and books have popped up quite often. I’d read a couple of his books a while ago and sort of re-discovered him more recently. And since then, his series has been getting more and more interesting. Which is why his books have become a ‘comfort read’ for me. I know that they’ll move fast and be interesting, but most of all, I love seeing the development of David Raker (the leading character).

There is, of course, always the question, “What if this isn’t as good as the previous ones?” But for the most part, Tim Weaver’s David Raker series has been consistently good.

Now that that explanation for why I’ve been devouring the David Raker series is out of the way, let’s come to You Were Gone – the ninth book in the series. Was this the book that broke the streak of ‘consistently good’? Read on to find out.

Genre: 

Thriller

Length: 

483 pages

Blurb:

When David Raker had to watch his wife slowly be consumed by the cancer that eventually took her life, he felt a part of him die too. He coped by choosing to become a missing persons investigator and helping others find closure. His work soon became an obsession, one that had repercussions on his health, and his doctor warned him that it could push him over the edge.

But years after Raker buries his wife, a woman walks into a police station, and tells them she’s been missing for eight years. She has no ID, no phone – only the name of her husband – David Raker. When Raker is called in by the DI, he finds himself looking at the woman who looks exactly like his dead wife and who knows intimate details of their marriage. She claims that Raker had a breakdown, that she had never died. And Raker is forced to question whether he knows his own truth at all. Did Derryn really die? Or is everything he knows… and lived… a lie created by his own fragile sanity?

Overall Rating:

10 out of 10

Plot:

10 out of 10

Characterization:

10 out of 10

Primary Element:

9 out of 10 for its thrill, 10 out of 10 for its mystery

Writing Style:

10 out of 10

Part of a Series: 

Yep, this is Book #9 in the David Raker series. While I have read reviews on Goodreads that say readers enjoyed this as a standalone, they did state that it took a couple chapters to get into it because of not having read the previous books. I’d definitely recommend starting from the first book, but if you’re just looking for an interesting read, this would work as a standalone too. You can find reviews of the previous book on this site too.

Highlighted Takeaway:

You Were Gone will make you question everything you believe about David Raker, leaving you in the same conundrum as the main character, and wondering if you’ve trusted the wrong (fictional) person all these years.

What I Liked:

Raker’s vulnerability and fragility, mentally and emotionally, is depicted really well, making it really easy to associate with him. At the same time, you find yourself questioning what you’ve known so far while also wondering about the truth. The mystery unfolds well, keeping the suspense going even as things get resolved along the way. Overall, the book moves fast, hits hard (emotionally), and keeps you turning the pages late into the night.

What I Didn’t Like:

There was nothing I can point out as having disliked. Like its preceding books, You Were Gone was an incredibly interesting and absorbing read.

Who Should Read It:

Anyone who loves thrillers and mysteries will like Tim Weaver’s work, including You Were Gone and its prequels. The David Raker series remains one of my favorites, book after book.

Who Should Avoid:

If you’re not a fan of mysteries, cold case books, or thrillers, or hate picking up books mid-series, I’d recommend avoiding this one.

Read It For:

The most personal case David Raker has ever found himself in.

As you may have realized by now, I’m definitely going to be finishing the David Raker series soon, finally catching up to the latest releases. I’ve got The Shadow at my Door bought and ready, but will buy and read No One Home prior to starting that (as I would like to go through this series in order).

In the meanwhile, I’m reading other authors (of course!). So stay tuned for more reviews coming up very soon. And as always, thanks for stopping by and checking out the posts on The Book Review Station!

– Rishika

Posted in All Book Reviews, Mystery, Thrillers

Book Review: I Am Missing (By Tim Weaver)

Missing persons investigator, David Raker, returns in I Am Missing. Except, this time, the case he’s presented with is not like anything he’s ever worked on.

I am a big fan of the David Raker series. Its chilling, fast-paced books have always been my ‘comfort reads’. While not all have been great, the series does a fantastic job of keeping the quality of almost every subsequent book as high as its predecessor. So, unsurprisingly, I went into I Am Missing with high expectations. Read on to know if they were met.

Genre:

Thriller

Length:

519 pages 

Blurb:

David Raker is presented with an unusual case – the person who hires him, wants him to find none other than himself. Richard Kite has no memory of who he is or where he came from. Nor of how he ended up beaten and bruised by the shore. The media named him ‘The Lost Man’. He assumed the name ‘Richard Kite’. Months later, in spite of media coverage and police investigations, Kite still has no answers. Which is why he turns to Raker. Now Raker needs to find out just who Kite is, why no one knows or remembers him, and what may connect him to a two-year-old, unsolved murder. As Raker delves deeper into the case, he’s faced with growing threats, and a single question – is Richard Kite a victim… or murderer?

Overall Rating:

10 out of 10

Plot:

10 out of 10

Characterization:

10 out of 10

Primary Element:

10 out of 10 for its thrill and its mystery

Writing Style:

10 out of 10

Part of a Series: 

Yes, this is Book No. 8 in the David Raker series. While the story will probably be an interesting read as a stand-alone, it is best read on order, especially if you really want to know what makes Raker who he is. Reviews for all the previous books in the series are available on the website.

Highlighted Takeaway:

In part wonderfully creepy and in part delightfully suspenseful, I Am Missing offers a unique take on missing-person mysteries that keeps you turning the pages relentlessly.

What I Liked:

The ‘past’ section of the book really gets quite under your skin, giving you the thrill that is typical of Tim Weaver’s work. Combined with the suspense and twist-filled ‘present’, you get a thriller that ties in multiple arcs really well and leaves you guessing until the end. Also, although the book is quite lengthy, it actually moves really quickly, not dragging at any point.

What I Didn’t Like:

There is nothing specific to dislike in I Am Missing. Although a part of it may seem fantastical, it actually provides convincing context.

Who Should Read It:

Anyone who enjoys thrillers set in small towns, and anyone who has read (or not read) any of the Raker books. While it may be best read in order, many first-time Tim Weaver readers have found I Am Missing to be a perfect starting point.

Who Should Avoid:

Anyone who doesn’t enjoy thrillers.

Read It For:

David Raker’s attempt and efforts at solving a case so different from his norm, and so very twisted.

Tim Weaver’s David Raker books continue to remain one of my favorite thriller series. I will definitely be reading the few remaining in the series, and would strongly recommend it to anyone who’s looking for a new thriller/mystery series or just a standalone book or two in the genre.

As always, thank you for stopping by The Book Review Station and reading my review! Got something to share? Drop us a line in the comments section below!

– Rishika

Posted in All Book Reviews

Not at all what you’d expect: A Review of What Remains by Tim Weaver

One of the main, parallel story arcs in Weaver’s books (and in David Raker’s life) is finally brought to the forefront in What Remains. Which is why I couldn’t help but pick it up, making it the only time I read a third book by the same author consecutively. And it did not disappoint!

Genre:

Thriller, Crime fiction

Length: 

592 pages

Blurb:

Missing persons investigator, David Raker, had barely had time to come to terms with the shocking events of his previous case – one that hit too close to home – when he gets a call from Colm Healy. Once a decorated cop, Healy’s career and life came crashing down around him when he ran into an unsolvable case – a single mother and two young girls murdered brutally in their own home. Angry, bitter, and forced to bear even more loss along the way, Healy never recovered. Raker is the only thing akin to a friend for him, even if he only speaks to him a few times a year. When Raker receives a call from Healy, he meets him because of the fragile yet strangely strong bond they share – one born of the fact that they had saved each other’s lives in the past. But nothing prepares him for the request that Healy makes – to help him find the man who murdered the family and solve the case that haunts him to this day. Raker accepts because he wants to bring home the lost soul that Healy has turned into. But nothing goes as expected. And as Raker persists, he discovers that Healy and he aren’t very different after all. Which brings him face to face with another realization – in walking the path that Healy had in search of seemingly unattainable answers, he may not have long before he gets lost too.

Overall Rating:

9 out of 10

Plot:

10 out of 10

Characterization:

10 out of 10

Primary Element:

8 out of 10 for its thrill

Writing Style:

10 out of 10 for Tim Weaver’s ability to keep you turning the pages as fast as you can, even three books in.

Part of a Series: 

Yes, this is Book #6 in the David Raker series. While it can, to a great extent be read as a standalone, you would run the risk of losing the suspense and mystery of the previous books. But, if you’re not interested in reading the entire series, Book #4 – Never Coming Back – is a good place to start too.

Highlighted Takeaway:

Colm Healy’s story. Heart-breaking, crazy, and heart-warming at the same time, Healy’s story as told in the past and present, overshadows even that of leading man, David Raker.

What I Liked:

Different timelines have been presented in the story in parallel and, unlike what happens in most such cases, the result is not choppy or confusing; instead, it manages to weave a really good tale that becomes even more layered.

What I Didn’t Like:

There was little to dislike in What Remains. Tim Weaver’s books get better as they go. Surprisingly, he continues to give plot twists that will have the desired effect on most readers, regardless of how many of his books they’ve read in the near or distant past.

Who Should Read It:

Anyone who enjoys crime fiction and thrillers, especially those who would like to follow the story of one character over many books.

Who Should Avoid:

Anyone who does not enjoy stories where the main characters are jaded and, often, not ethical.

Read It For:

Colm Healy’s story. Although a David Raker book, What Remains is more about Healy – the man he was, the man he became, and the case that utterly destroyed him. The focus on his character and story is both satisfying and emotional, and exceeds all expectations.

What Remains is an incredibly satisfying read that finally concludes the case that turned Colm Healy’s life and character into one that became unrecognizable to all those who knew him before it transpired. And it redefines even Raker’s understanding of who Healy really is, as he delves into who Healy was in a time before he’d known him. It’s a must-read if you’ve been following David Raker and Colm Healy’s stories, and a good series to consider if you haven’t.

As always, thanks for stopping by and reading my review.

– Rishika