Posted in All Book Reviews, Crime fiction, Thrillers

Book Review: The Guilty (By David Baldacci)

I’ve been reading a lot of David Baldacci lately. Part of the reason for that is that he’s another of my “comfort” reads authors. His books are generally engaging with interesting plots. The second reason is that I’m midway on multiple series, including the Will Robie and Jessica Reel, Amos Decker, John Puller, and Atlee Pine series. And I want to wrap them up before moving on to his newer ones. Right now, though, I’m focused on the Will Robie series, mainly because Robie makes an appearance in the next Amos Decker book and I just have to finish the Robie series and get to the Decker one in order. Make of that obsession what you will.

Anyway… let’s get right into the book review of The Guilty.

Genre: 

Thriller, Crime fiction

Length: 

420 pages

Blurb:

When elite government assassin, Will Robie, finds himself unable to pull the trigger on a mission, he finds himself adrift. His entire life has been about the job, and without his skills… he’s almost nothing. To recover his skill, he needs to resolve what’s holding him back – his past. He needs to return to Cantrell, Mississippi, the town he had left behind without another look twenty years ago. He needs to return to his father, because of whom he’d left town in the first place. Dan Robie had been elected town judge in the years since Robie left. But now, he was arrested and charged with murder. With the entire town sure of his guilt, Dan Robie offers no defense. Will’s return to the town is met with suspicion, by strangers and his own father. Yet Will perseveres. Supported by Jessica Reel, he begins his own investigation and soon discovers that Cantrell has a lot to hide. Can Will Robie prove his father’s innocence? Or is Dan Robie truly guilty? And will either live long enough to repair their bond?

Overall Rating:

7 out of 10

Plot:

8 out of 10

Characterization:

8 out of 10

Primary Element:

6 out of 10 for its suspense

Writing Style:

6 out of 10

Part of a Series: 

Yes. This is Book #4 in the Will Robie series. Jessica Reel makes her first appearance in Book #2.

Highlighted Takeaway:

With an unexpected look into the past that makes Will Robie who he is, The Guilty brings a personal perspective into an otherwise inscrutable character.

What I Liked:

The Guilty has an interesting plot that mixes past and present really well. It also brings the multiple layers you expect from a Baldacci book, with the arcs tying together neatly. While it’s not the most unpredictable, the story does pack its share of surprises.

What I Didn’t Like:

This was something I never thought I’d say about David Baldacci, but it really seemed like this was ghostwritten by someone else, with his name just added in at the end. The style was obviously different at the outset. While it still is a good read, it’s just not what you would expect. Whether it’s Baldacci trying something different or a mismatched ghostwriting attempt, it definitely affects the reading experience.

Who Should Read It:

If you’ve come this far in the Will Robie series, give The Guilty a shot. It’s a good addition to the story. Anyone who enjoys crime fiction and mysteries will also like The Guilty – at its core, it is a murder mystery.

Who Should Avoid:

If the recent David Baldacci books haven’t been meeting your expectations, I suspect this one too would do the same. Best to avoid if you’re not a fan of Baldacci, the Robie series, or mysteries in general.

Read It For:

The continuation of Will Robie and Jessica Reel’s story. (Really, at this point, it looks like the series is moving to a conclusion on their characters and storylines, after the event in Book #1, which was the catalyst for the change in the status quo.)

Although The Guilty wasn’t as great as I’d hoped, I’m still going to see the series through. And then move on to completing the Amos Decker series (which I hope to God is maintaining its quality). Share your thoughts on all these series and Baldacci, or any of your favorite books, in the comments below.

And as always, thanks for stopping at The Book Review Station and reading this review!

– Rishika