Posted in All Book Reviews, Crime fiction, Mystery

Book Review: Walk the Wire (By David Baldacci)

Walk the Wire is Book #6 in David Baldacci’s Amos Decker series. If you’ve read any of my previous reviews on the Amos Decker books, you already know that he’s one of my favorite literary characters – a decent person who is just trying his best against the odds he’s facing. Ever since his introduction in Memory Man, I’ve followed his story arc dedicatedly. In fact, I even completed the Will Robie and Jessica Reel series prior to reading Walk the Wire because those characters make an appearance in this one.

So did Book #6 meet expectations? Read on to find out.

Genre: 

Crime fiction

Length: 

422 pages

Blurb:

Amos Decker and his partner, Alex Jamison, are sent to London, North Dakota to solve the murder of a young woman. The victim was perfectly autopsied before being dumped in the open. Decker and Jamison have no idea why they were sent in to investigate a single local murder. But what they find is a thriving fracking town with its share of oddities. A mysterious government facility, home of a local religious sect, and a business rivalry that stretches into the past are a few of the things skewing the investigation. And things only get more complicated when Jamison and Decker learn that the victim was a schoolteacher by day, and a prostitute by night. As they persevere in their pursuit of the truth, Jamison and Decker find themselves in graver danger than ever before. Will assistance from an unexpected ally keep them safe? Or is the truth larger and more dangerous than any of them could ever imagine?

Overall Rating:

3 out of 10 stars

Plot:

3 out of 10 stars

Characterization:

4 out of 10 stars

Primary Element:

3 out of 10 for its suspense and mystery, not because it didn’t have any, but because whether it did or not is made irrelevant.

Writing Style:

5 out of 10

Part of a Series: 

Yes. This is Book #6 in the Amos Decker series.

Highlighted Takeaway:

Walk the Wire does an excellent job (and by far the best I’ve seen) in absolutely ruining an incredible character and their story arc.

What I Liked:

It had Amos Decker, who I (still) like. But only because there are a few (very, very few) sections that do justice to the character you’ve come to appreciate.

What I Didn’t Like:

Okay… There are quite a few things here, so let’s make a list.

  1. The story is just all over the place. While multiple angles is often common in Baldacci’s work, Walk the Wire had so many things going on that it began to feel like additional angles were only added in because the main story had limited depth.
  2. The main story had limited depth. It was something that probably seemed like a good mystery at some point, but had little in the way of suspense and intrigue, leading to a weak premise and the need for so many tangents.
  3. Did David Baldacci really write this? I’ve mention in my past reviews on Baldacci’s more recent works that it’s increasingly seeming like he’s relying on ghostwriters. And the style, pace, unnecessary tangents, and weak premise of Walk the Wire make it seem like this is no different.
  4. Whoever wrote it did not know Amos Decker. The (beloved) character is anything but himself. You could literally replace him with anyone – known or unknown – and have the same result. Occasionally, whoever wrote this book seemed to remember what made Decker interesting; they then wrote some basic paragraph about him, and went back to forgetting about his capabilities.
  5. Writing style was just blah. In spite of so much going on, including a potentially intriguing murder mystery, the writing style was too blah to evoke any interest. It took some effort to keep reading.
  6. The cringe dialog. Sometimes, “cool” dialog can be fun. But if you’re going to use the same line and same situation for a character’s “cool and heroic” entry every time, it’s going to become pointless. And that’s what happens with the Reel and Robie angle.

Who Should Read It:

If you’re terribly bored and have read every other book there is, then (and only then) would I recommend reading Walk the Wire. And this holds true even if you’ve read other books in the Amos Decker series.

Who Should Avoid:

If you’ve not read the Decker series before, don’t let this one be your starting point. If you’re a big Baldacci fan, avoid this one. It might have his name, but it has nothing else of his style. And if you’re a fan of the Memory Man, avoid Walk the Wire. It adds nothing to the series and actually manages to completely ruin an amazing character.

Read It For:

Passing time that you should probably spend reading something better. Even the extended Robie and Reel cameos do nothing to save it.

I am physically upset that David Baldacci ruined Amos Decker as a character with Walk the Wire. If you’re a fan of the series, I would recommend stopping at Book #5. You won’t get anything new from the sixth instalment.

Walk the Wire also led to the end of my fandom with Baldacci. I may still finish the John Puller and Atlee Pine series, which I began a while ago, only because I want to see how their continued arcs end. But, it’ll be a while before I get to them (while praying that their characters haven’t been ruined by Baldacci).

Let me know your thoughts on David Baldacci and his works in the comments below. And as always, thank you for stopping at The Book Review Station and reading this review.

– Rishika

Posted in All Book Reviews, Crime fiction, Mystery, Thrillers

Book Review: End Game (By David Baldacci)

End Game is the last (as of now) in the Will Robie and Jessica Reel series. As some of the characters are supposed to make an appearance in his other series on Amos Decker (Memory Man), I wanted to wrap this one up and not run the risk of missing anything.

The last book in the series – The Guilty – had its ups and downs, although it was more good than bad. End Game was not too different. Read on to find out what worked and didn’t work, for me, in this David Baldacci book.

Genre: 

Mystery, Thriller

Length: 

408 pages

Blurb:

Jessica Reel and Will Robie return in End Game. But, instead of being out of the country taking down its enemies, these two government assets are sent to rural Colorado on a much more personal mission. Blue Man, their handler, superior, and friend, has gone missing when he had taken a rare fishing vacation to his hometown of Grand. When Reel and Robie arrive, they find a town with a stagnant economy, an understaffed police force, and camps recruiting people with dangerous ideologies. As they delve deeper into the mystery behind Blue Man’s disappearance, they find themselves facing an adversary who has a home and firepower advantage. Will they find Blue Man before it’s too late for themselves?

Overall Rating:

7 out of 10 stars

Plot:

8 out of 10 stars

Characterization:

8 out of 10 stars

Primary Element:

8 out of 10 for its mystery

Writing Style:

7 out of 10 stars

Part of a Series: 

Yes. This is Book #5 in the Will Robie series and, from what I can tell, possibly the last one.

Highlighted Takeaway:

A well-crafted tale that brings together mystery, suspense, and the results of social, political, and systemic issues.

What I Liked and Didn’t Like:

I’m combining the two sections that are usually separate in my blog posts because there were a lot of things I liked, but that at the same time could be considered out of character and strange for a David Baldacci book.

The primary one is the Reel/Robie arc. End Game picks up very differently on their relationship than where its prequel, The Guilty, ended. And their relationship remains off as the book progresses, often with irrational behavior. While I actually sort of enjoyed the personal angle, I did find it odd – it simply seemed to be an ‘extra’ to keep readers vested in the characters… something that was just not the norm with Baldacci. And I’m still not sure if it was needed. You could have taken that whole angle out and the book would have not really been much different. Consequently, the other personal/relationship angles that the story went into seemed a bit forced.

The mystery and suspense were good, with a lot of arcs that offered surprises. But, a lot of it was also unrealistic. At this point, Robie and Reel seem more superhuman than skilled (and uncharacteristically boastful too). Their character arcs seem to now be driven by someone who’s crushing on how cool they are. Which is off-brand for them. So there’s that contradiction, which is enjoyable (I mean, cheesy dialog has its moments) but not the norm for these characters.

The tale reads well (better than The Guilty), while still seeming to be written by not-Baldacci. Overall, a good story with a satisfactory (sort-of) end to the Robie/Reel books.

Who Should Read It:

If you’ve been reading the Will Robie series, I’d definitely recommend reading End Game and seeing it through. Also, if you like political mysteries and thrillers in general, the series is a good one (just probably not the best ever).

Who Should Avoid:

If you’ve not read any of the previous books in the series, I’d recommend passing on this one. It will work as a standalone, but you’ll miss out on a lot of the early character development, and that will take a lot out of the story.

Read It For:

The conclusion (again, assuming this is the last one) of the Robie and Reel series. Both are likable characters, even if often unrealistic.

You can get your copy of End Game by David Baldacci in paperback here, and in hardcover here.

Got something to share about David Baldacci’s books or other thrillers/mysteries? Drop us a comment below. And as always, thanks for stopping by The Book Review Station!

This post contains affiliate links. The Book Review Station may earn a small commission, at no additional cost to you, if you use these links to purchase books. Thanks!

– Rishika

Posted in All Book Reviews, Crime fiction, Thrillers

Book Review: The Guilty (By David Baldacci)

I’ve been reading a lot of David Baldacci lately. Part of the reason for that is that he’s another of my “comfort” reads authors. His books are generally engaging with interesting plots. The second reason is that I’m midway on multiple series, including the Will Robie and Jessica Reel, Amos Decker, John Puller, and Atlee Pine series. And I want to wrap them up before moving on to his newer ones. Right now, though, I’m focused on the Will Robie series, mainly because Robie makes an appearance in the next Amos Decker book and I just have to finish the Robie series and get to the Decker one in order. Make of that obsession what you will.

Anyway… let’s get right into the book review of The Guilty.

Genre: 

Thriller, Crime fiction

Length: 

420 pages

Blurb:

When elite government assassin, Will Robie, finds himself unable to pull the trigger on a mission, he finds himself adrift. His entire life has been about the job, and without his skills… he’s almost nothing. To recover his skill, he needs to resolve what’s holding him back – his past. He needs to return to Cantrell, Mississippi, the town he had left behind without another look twenty years ago. He needs to return to his father, because of whom he’d left town in the first place. Dan Robie had been elected town judge in the years since Robie left. But now, he was arrested and charged with murder. With the entire town sure of his guilt, Dan Robie offers no defense. Will’s return to the town is met with suspicion, by strangers and his own father. Yet Will perseveres. Supported by Jessica Reel, he begins his own investigation and soon discovers that Cantrell has a lot to hide. Can Will Robie prove his father’s innocence? Or is Dan Robie truly guilty? And will either live long enough to repair their bond?

Overall Rating:

7 out of 10

Plot:

8 out of 10

Characterization:

8 out of 10

Primary Element:

6 out of 10 for its suspense

Writing Style:

6 out of 10

Part of a Series: 

Yes. This is Book #4 in the Will Robie series. Jessica Reel makes her first appearance in Book #2.

Highlighted Takeaway:

With an unexpected look into the past that makes Will Robie who he is, The Guilty brings a personal perspective into an otherwise inscrutable character.

What I Liked:

The Guilty has an interesting plot that mixes past and present really well. It also brings the multiple layers you expect from a Baldacci book, with the arcs tying together neatly. While it’s not the most unpredictable, the story does pack its share of surprises.

What I Didn’t Like:

This was something I never thought I’d say about David Baldacci, but it really seemed like this was ghostwritten by someone else, with his name just added in at the end. The style was obviously different at the outset. While it still is a good read, it’s just not what you would expect. Whether it’s Baldacci trying something different or a mismatched ghostwriting attempt, it definitely affects the reading experience.

Who Should Read It:

If you’ve come this far in the Will Robie series, give The Guilty a shot. It’s a good addition to the story. Anyone who enjoys crime fiction and mysteries will also like The Guilty – at its core, it is a murder mystery.

Who Should Avoid:

If the recent David Baldacci books haven’t been meeting your expectations, I suspect this one too would do the same. Best to avoid if you’re not a fan of Baldacci, the Robie series, or mysteries in general.

Read It For:

The continuation of Will Robie and Jessica Reel’s story. (Really, at this point, it looks like the series is moving to a conclusion on their characters and storylines, after the event in Book #1, which was the catalyst for the change in the status quo.)

Although The Guilty wasn’t as great as I’d hoped, I’m still going to see the series through. And then move on to completing the Amos Decker series (which I hope to God is maintaining its quality). Share your thoughts on all these series and Baldacci, or any of your favorite books, in the comments below.

And as always, thanks for stopping at The Book Review Station and reading this review!

– Rishika

Posted in All Book Reviews, Thrillers

Book Review: The Target (By David Baldacci)

Happy New Year!

I am incredibly late to the wishes as well as to posting book reviews. In all honesty, I have been occupied with reading and trying to get back into the groove of working on my ongoing novel.

But! Here we are – and although we’re more than a month into 2022, I’m starting this year’s reviews off with the book that took up most of December 2021 for me.

Will Robie and Jessica Reel return in The Target. After the introduction of Jessica Reel in The Hit, and the related growth of Robie’s character, the series became one that I definitely wanted to follow.

Unfortunately, The Target didn’t keep the momentum going as expected. It had some stuff really going for it, but other stuff that seemed just… blah. So is it worth reading, whether to just continue the series or otherwise? Read on to know.

Genre: 

Political Thriller

Length: 

420 pages

Blurb:

Jessica Reel and Will Robie aren’t in the best position with the Head of the CIA after recent events. Yet, when a mission of utmost importance arises – one that is against every rule in the book – Reel and Robie’s skills make them the go-to team. First, though, they need to pass rigorous training so that the CIA can trust them again. Even as they face grueling routines, plainly designed to break them, people from Reel’s past return, thirsty for revenge. Will Reel and Robie make it through their ordeal? What mission lies ahead for them if they do? Or will none of that matter as Reel’s past and her and Robie’s present clash?

Overall Rating:

4 out of 10

Plot:

4 out of 10 (some plot lines were more around 1 out of 10, while others were around 8, so I’m including a sort-of average)

Characterization:

7 out of 10, especially for the character growth

Primary Element:

4 out of 10 for its thrill, because the story tended to be a hotch-potch rather than a well-woven tale of different arcs.

Writing Style:

6 out of 10

Part of a Series: 

Yes, this is Book 3 in the Will Robie series. Check out the details and reviews of Book #1, The Innocent, here and Book #2, The Hit, here.

Highlighted Takeaway:

Although most of the arcs are easy to forget, The Target brings forth Reel’s very interesting past, making it that much easier to root for her.

What I Liked:

The development of Jessica Reel’s story and its tie-in to the present, as well as the growth of the other characters.

What I Didn’t Like:

Other than Reel’s story, the book is just okay. The multiple plot lines are, surprisingly for a Baldacci book, extremely disjointed. While the end result is satisfying enough, it’s a bumpy road to get there.

Who Should Read It:

If you enjoy the Will Robie series, you should read The Target. While it may not be the best in the series, it is instrumental in following the development of the characters.

Who Should Avoid:

If you’re looking to start a new David Baldacci series, the Will Robie one (including The Target) may be best avoided.

Read It For:

A bridge between the rest of the Will Robie books, and the history of Jessica Reel.

I was genuinely disappointed at how The Target did not hold its own before its prequels. While Will Robie isn’t my favorite Baldacci character, I had grown to like his series, especially the addition of Jessica Reel. The weak storyline as well as lack of interconnectedness made it little more than an average read. I’ll still continue with the series, of course, but I can only hope that the next one is better.

And, most importantly, I’m so very, very glad that this wasn’t the book on which I ended 2021. This ended up being the second-to-last one of the year, with Tim Weaver’s I Am Missing being the last. Book review of that thriller will be up very soon!

As always, thanks for stopping by The Book Review Station and reading my review!

Rishika

Posted in All Book Reviews, Thrillers

Book Review: The Hit (By David Baldacci)

The Hit brings assassin Will Robie back. The first book in the series – The Innocent was good (although not great) and Robie stood out as a character with a lot of potential. And in Book #2 of the series, you can see that potential being realized!

Genre: 

Thriller (although, I would label the Will Robie series political thrillers)

Length: 

392 pages

Blurb:

Will Robie works for a small, elite unit of the US Government. He has only one duty – to kill enemies of the state before they can unleash hell on thousands of innocent victims. And he’s the best at the job. The only one who can match him in skill and talent is Jessica Reel. A fellow assassin, she has almost as many kills as Robie and is just as reputed for her ability and her loyalty. But now, Reel has turned on the agency. She’s hunting their own. And Robie is ordered to bring her back – alive or dead. Robie can think like Reel, which makes him the agency’s best chance at capturing her. But as Robie pursues Reel, he discovers two things – one, he is always one step behind and Reel can predict him just as well as he can predict her, and two, something about her being a traitor doesn’t fit right. Soon, Robie discovers that there’s much more than what meets the eye, in Reel and in his assignment. And he needs to find the answers that remain elusive if he is to thwart a threat targeted not only at the United States, but at the world at large.

Overall Rating:

8 out of 10

Plot:

9 out of 10

Characterization:

7 out of 10, mainly because I felt the strong characterization drop a bit as the story progresses

Primary Element:

8 out of 10 for its thrill

Writing Style:

9 out of 10

Part of a Series: 

Yes, this is Book #2 in the Will Robie series. It has characters from the previous book, and is best read in order if you don’t want spoilers.

Highlighted Takeaway:

A twisted tale of patriotism, family, and duty, The Hit is equal parts action and political gambit.

What I Liked:

Will Robie’s character is really fleshed out in The Hit. His humanity, sense of duty, and even patriotism is questioned, as are his skills – and each challenge gives the reader a chance to see more of what he’s made of, even as he discovers it himself. Reel’s character is also just as good, and the two keep the reader very invested. The detail in some of the action scenes was incredible, painting an extremely vivid picture. The story itself was good too – not over the top as some political thrillers can be – and maintains the mystery and suspense till the end.

What I Didn’t Like:

I loved Jessica Reel’s introduction, and for the first half of the book, she gave Robie a real fight. But, at one point, it seemed like her awesomeness was… conveniently downplayed. I really wanted to see her hold her own more than she did.

Who Should Read It:

Anyone who enjoys thrillers based around political aspirations, or books that are based around spies and international assassinations.

Who Should Avoid:

If high-stakes political threats are not your cup of tea, I would recommend avoiding this one. For lovers of more crime-related thrillers, I would recommend other books by Baldacci, such as Memory Man featuring Amos Decker (one of my favorite literary characters) or even the Atlee Pine or John Puller series. Although the latter two do start with some political/government angles in their first books, they eventually evolve into crime-thriller series.

Read It For:

The interesting results of two trained assassins tossed out of their depth, discovering themselves, as they strive to do what they believe is right.

I hadn’t expected the second book to be that much better than the first, and so I was pleasantly surprised with how well it turned out. The Hit started a little slow, but really picked up. If you liked Baldacci’s Camel Club series, you will definitely like the Will Robie series!

Got anything to add? Share your thoughts in the comments below. And as always, thanks for stopping by and reading my review!

– Rishika

Posted in All Book Reviews, Crime fiction, Thrillers

Book Review: A Minute to Midnight (By David Baldacci)

I’d read the first book of the Atlee Pine series, Long Road to Mercy, a while ago. It was good, but not great, and set the stage for Baldacci’s (sort-of) first female lead protagonist. The characterization of Atlee Pine was the best part of the book, which made me want to read more about her. And so, I picked up the second book in the series – A Minute to Midnight. Read on to know more about how and why this was so much better than its prequel, and where its shortcomings were.

Genre: 

Mystery, Thriller

Length: 

434 pages

Blurb:

Atlee Pine’s past is catching up. When she was six years old, someone snuck into her bedroom, kidnapped her twin sister, and left her for dead. Their parents were passed out downstairs after a night of partying. Pine suspects Daniel James Tor, a serial killer who fits the bill and is now locked away in a maximum security prison in Colorado. Now an FBI agent, Pine has put a lot of bad people away. But when an incident at work makes her realize that she’s letting her demons take control, she does the only thing she can to set things right – returns to the town where she lost her sister with the goal of finding answers. But when a body turns up indicating a ritualistic killing, Pine is pulled into the investigation. Working on both cases, she soon begins to realize that nothing is as she believes – not the present… and definitely not the past.

Overall Rating:

10 out of 10

Plot:

9 out of 10

Characterization:

10 out of 10

Primary Element:

10 out of 10 for its mystery

Writing Style:

10 out of 10

Part of a Series: 

Yes, this is Book No. 2 in the Atlee Pine series. You could read it as a standalone, but you would definitely miss out on some background and context.

Highlighted Takeaway:

A super-smooth read, A Minute to Midnight has everything you’d want in a page-turner – mystery, action, and well fleshed out characterization.

What I Liked:

Atlee Pine makes for an interesting character – easy to associate with, impressive, emotional, and intrinsically genuine. The story has really good suspense, leaving you guessing until the end. Even where things seem predictable, there are aspects that retain their mystery until the very end. And, as always with Baldacci’s work, there are numerous story arcs unfolding at the same time and they do come together well.

What I Didn’t Like:

There was nothing that I specifically disliked – the book reads really well through and through.

Who Should Read It:

Anyone who enjoys murder mysteries, crime thrillers, and crime fiction. A Minute to Midnight is, for the most part, about the murders, with a smaller chunk dedicated to Pine’s past.

Who Should Avoid:

Anyone who doesn’t like multi-layered stories (there is a lot going on in the book) and crime fiction.

Read It For:

The evolution of Pine’s character – she is much easier to associate with in the second book of the series and you will find yourself rooting for her.

I’ve always enjoyed Baldacci’s work, and am now planning to finish reading the remaining books in the series of Atlee Pine, Will Robie, and John Puller, before returning to my favorite Baldacci character – Amos Decker. That seems like a lot of books, but the best part of them is that each character works in very different settings, and Baldacci definitely uses slightly different styles for each. Which makes it that much easier, and that much more fun!

Coming up next, a review of The Hit, the second book in Baldacci’s Will Robie series. If you’d like to share your thoughts on David Baldacci or any of his books and characters (or any books in general), drop us a line in the comments below. And as always, thanks for making a stop at The Book Review Station!

– Rishika

Posted in All Book Reviews

Great start, but fizzles out: Review of Long Road to Mercy by David Baldacci

David Baldacci introduces a new lead character – FBI Agent Atlee Pine – in the first of a series dedicated to her. A well-developed, likable heroine, Atlee Pine leaves an impression in Long Road to Mercy. The book had some great parts and some not-so-great parts. Keep going to read the entire review!

Long road to mercy - David Baldacci - Atlee Pine
Source: Goodreads

Genre:

Thriller

Length:

404 Pages

Blurb:

Atlee Pine was six years old when a kidnapper snuck into the room she shared with her twin sister, used a random nursery rhyme to select his victim, and left with Mercy. Atlee never saw her sister again. But the event drove her to become the justice-keeper she is. Thirty years later, the only agent assigned to the FBI’s Arizona Resident Agency at Shattered Rock, she is responsible for the protection of the Grand Canyon. But even with her experience and outlook, Atlee could not pre-empt the convoluted web she finds herself in when she begins to investigate a stabbed Grand Canyon mule and its missing rider. Soon, Atlee realizes that those she considered her allies may not be so, and enemies – known and unknown – are waiting at every turn. Will Atlee win the fight for the democracy of the country she swore to protect, or will her battle end with her life?

Overall Rating:

6 out of 10

Plot:

8 out of 10

Characterization:

8 out of 10

Primary Element:

7 out of 10 for its suspense-filled storyline, and 6 out of 10 for its thrill.

Writing Style:

7 out of 10

Part of a Series: 

Yes. This is the first of the Atlee Pine series. The second book, A Minute to Midnight, comes out in November 2019 (and looks pretty kick-ass).

Highlighted Takeaway:

Atlee Pine, as created by Baldacci. Admitting that it’s his first time attempting a female lead, Baldacci does a good job of creating a character that is easy to associate with, and complex enough to be realistic.

What I Liked:

The plot: It was really well-woven, introducing the reader to unknown ideas that could very well be real (some aspects may or may not be based in reality, in fact – I didn’t check).

What I Didn’t Like:

The depth of the Grand Canyon’s geography: While it was meant as an immersive narrative, it got a bit too mundane and made me zone out a bit when there was little but details of the Canyon for pages on end.

Who Should Read It:

Anyone who enjoys political thrillers and other Baldacci books. Or anyone who likes crime fiction.

Who Should Avoid:

The book has nothing that would specifically turn someone off.

Read It For:

The beginning of a new character series that shows a lot of promise and sets the stage for a story arc that you would want to follow, if you enjoy crime fiction.

Got something to share about Long Road to Mercy or David Baldacci or Atlee Pine? Share your thoughts in the comments below.

And, as always, thanks for stopping by and reading my review!

– Rishika

Posted in All Book Reviews

Keeps the Pace Up: A Review of Redemption (By David Baldacci)

Amos Decker is back!

If you’ve read any of my previous reviews of the books starring the man brought to life by David Baldacci, you’ll know that Amos Decker is one of my favorite literary characters. And Redemption, while keeping up the pace that its prequel – the Fallen – had set, just adds more reasons to love the flawed, moralistic, often pig-headed Decker.

David Baldacci Redemption
Source: Goodreads

Genre:

Mystery, Thriller

Length:

418 pages

Blurb:

Amos Decker returns to his hometown of Burlington to visit his wife and daughter’s graves on the day that would have been his daughter’s fourteenth birthday, and comes face to face with Meryl Hawkins. Hawkins had murdered four people, thirteen years ago, including two children. He’d been found guilty of the murder on the basis of overwhelming evidence – evidence that Decker and his partner, Mary Lancaster, had found as detectives assigned to their first homicide. Released due to a terminal illness, Hawkins claims that he’s innocent, and he wants Decker to find the real killer. Decker refuses. Until another murder shocks the town and brings up an unexpected connection to the thirteen-year-old case. Had Decker really made a mistake and caused an innocent man’s incarceration? If Hawkins was innocent, who had really committed the four murders? And how many people may die if Decker doesn’t find the right answers in time?

Overall Rating:

8 out of 10

Plot:

8 out of 10

Characterization:

10 out of 10

Primary Element:

7 out of 10 for its mystery

Writing Style:

7 out of 10

Part of a Series: 

Yes. This is the fifth book in the Amos Decker series, which is best read in chronological order:

  1. Memory Man (review here)
  2. The Last Mile (review here)
  3. The Fix (review here)
  4. The Fallen (review here)

Highlighted Takeaway:

The shift from who Decker began as in Memory Man, to the character he’s now been made into. It’s a risk – playing with the essence of what makes Decker, Decker. But Baldacci has built the shift well over the series, making it such that you can easily associate and empathize with this version of him.

What I Liked:

Each character holds their own in Redemption, making for a book that has multiple personal tangents that tie together really well. Vulnerabilities and strengths of all characters are well-explored to make them all relatable, and get the reader invested in the story.

What I Didn’t Like:

There was nothing specific that is unlikable in the book.

Who Should Read It:

Anyone who enjoys intricate and layered storylines, and anyone who likes complex mysteries that are about more than just the case at hand. Also, anyone who’s a fan of David Baldacci – the Decker series is one of his most popular one and for good reason.

Who Should Avoid:

People that enjoy thrillers where the chill gets into your bone. While Redemption is a thriller in that you’re turning the pages in a rush to know what happens next, it won’t leave you looking over your shoulder. So if that’s what you look for in a thriller, then it may be best to avoid Redemption.

Read It For:

A complex but well-laid storyline, great characterization, and the intriguing development of Amos Decker’s character.

Have you read David Baldacci’s Redemption yet? Share your thoughts on the book (or any other) in the comments below. And thanks for stopping by!

– Rishika

 

Posted in All Book Reviews

A Satisfactory Sequel: A Review of The Forgotten by David Baldacci

The Forgotten is the sequel to Zero Day (review here), which introduces us to John Puller, an Army CID agent who is disciplined, patriotic, and has a strong moral axis. While the introductory book had him handling a matter of national security, The Forgotten has Puller on a case that’s more personal.

A good sequel, it adds a lot of depth to Puller’s character, and makes for a good, quick-paced read with a lot of layers.

The Forgotten by David Baldacci

Source: Goodreads

Genre:

Thriller, Mystery

Length: 

596 pages

Blurb:

John Puller is still struggling to come to terms with the events of his last case. When he visits his father, his plan to unwind during a few weeks off comes to an abrupt halt. His father has received a letter from his aunt, one in which she confides that her town, Paradise, is far from its namesake. Puller hasn’t been in touch with his aunt for a long time, but remembers her for the crucial role she played in positively shaping his childhood. So when he travels to Paradise and discovers that she’s dead, he knows there’s more to the story than meets the eye. The police insist that his aunt’s death was caused by accidental drowning. The town of Paradise is separated into the side that the tourists see, and one that no one wants to see. And Puller has attracted the attention of some very unpleasant men who want to see him dead, or close to it. But Puller will do whatever it takes to get the right answers… as long as he can stay alive long enough to do so.

Overall Rating:

7 out of 10

Plot:

8 out of 10

Characterization:

8 out of 10

Primary Element:

7 out of 10 for its mystery, and 5 out of 10 for the ‘thriller’ factor.

Writing Style:

8 out of 10

Part of a Series: 

Yes. This is Book #2 of the John Puller series. It can be read as a standalone, but is best read in order of the series. If you want to start with this one though, you can, because it gives nothing of Book #1 away.

Highlighted Takeaway:

Some very large plot twists that you don’t see coming, and that really overcome the predictability of some parts of the story arc.

What I Liked:

The way many different storylines that are running in parallel come together to make for a wholesome, very satisfying conclusion. And, the growth of Puller’s character – with every passing experience, Puller takes a closer look at himself and the principles and rules he’s lived by throughout his life, beliefs that are now conflicting with his sense of morality. Baldacci beautifully handles this development without making it seem forced, while also laying the groundwork for what could potentially be a very intriguing story arc for Puller.

What I Didn’t Like:

Some parts of the story were a little too predictable.

Who Should Read It:

Anyone who enjoys a good suburban chaos mystery, David Baldacci’s work, or just a well-rounded, intricate mystery/thriller plot.

Who Should Avoid:

I wouldn’t recommend this to anyone who doesn’t enjoy suspense or mystery, because the book is lengthy and convoluted, and takes its time going through multiple avenues before reaching a conclusion.

Read It For:

The continuation of John Puller’s story.

Have you read any of David Baldacci’s books? Who’s your favorite character – Puller, Maxwell, King, Pine, Decker, or someone else? Share your thoughts in the comments below.

And, as always, thanks for stopping by!

– Rishika

Posted in All Book Reviews

Review: Zero Day (By David Baldacci)

Hey there! Starting the year off with some David Baldacci and a whole new style of review! Read on and let me know in the comments what other books you’d like to see dissected this way (or just say Hi!).

Oh and… Happy, Happy New Year!

11007587
Source: Goodreads

Genre: Thriller

Length: 434 pages

Blurb:

War hero and brilliant US Army CID investigator, John Puller, gets sent on a solo mission to investigate four gruesome murders in the remote town of Drake, West Virginia. He works with local Police Chief, Samantha Cole, delving into a mystery that only deepens with every answer. Now, it’s up to Puller and Cole to solve the puzzle behind the increasing number of murders in a case that has greater implications and risks than either of them could have ever imagined.

Overall Rating: 7 out of 10

Plot: 7 out of 10

Characterization: 8 out of 10

Primary Element: 6 out of 10 for its ‘Thrill’ factor

Writing Style: 9 out of 10

Part of a Series?

Zero Day is the first book of Baldacci’s John Puller series. It would be best to start from here to get a good grasp of Puller, his background, and what makes him tick.

Highlighted Takeaway:

John Puller – the book is all about him, and his hard as nails but ideal within character and personality make that focus well worth it.

What I Liked:

Baldacci does not shy away from showcasing his main character’s strengths but also shows his vulnerability, which makes him a lot easier to relate with.

What I Didn’t Like:

Samantha Cole’s character gets a bit too subdued over the course of the book, losing a lot of its edge in Puller’s shadow.

Who Should Read:

  • Those who enjoy Baldacci’s work
  • Fans of the Amos Decker series
  • Anyone looking for a well-layered, complex plot-based book

Who Should Avoid:

Anyone who gets queasy easily, because there is a good chunk of violence in Zero Day.

Read It For:

  • its complex, layered storyline
  • an intriguing and very likable hero
  • Baldacci’s style finesse (which made him the success he is)

Want me to include any additional elements in this new review format? Let me know in the comments below!

– Rishika