Posted in All Book Reviews, Crime fiction, Mystery, Thrillers

Book Review: You Were Gone (By Tim Weaver)

If you’ve been reading the last few reviews on this site, you would’ve noticed that Tim Weaver’s name and books have popped up quite often. I’d read a couple of his books a while ago and sort of re-discovered him more recently. And since then, his series has been getting more and more interesting. Which is why his books have become a ‘comfort read’ for me. I know that they’ll move fast and be interesting, but most of all, I love seeing the development of David Raker (the leading character).

There is, of course, always the question, “What if this isn’t as good as the previous ones?” But for the most part, Tim Weaver’s David Raker series has been consistently good.

Now that that explanation for why I’ve been devouring the David Raker series is out of the way, let’s come to You Were Gone – the ninth book in the series. Was this the book that broke the streak of ‘consistently good’? Read on to find out.

Genre: 

Thriller

Length: 

483 pages

Blurb:

When David Raker had to watch his wife slowly be consumed by the cancer that eventually took her life, he felt a part of him die too. He coped by choosing to become a missing persons investigator and helping others find closure. His work soon became an obsession, one that had repercussions on his health, and his doctor warned him that it could push him over the edge.

But years after Raker buries his wife, a woman walks into a police station, and tells them she’s been missing for eight years. She has no ID, no phone – only the name of her husband – David Raker. When Raker is called in by the DI, he finds himself looking at the woman who looks exactly like his dead wife and who knows intimate details of their marriage. She claims that Raker had a breakdown, that she had never died. And Raker is forced to question whether he knows his own truth at all. Did Derryn really die? Or is everything he knows… and lived… a lie created by his own fragile sanity?

Overall Rating:

10 out of 10

Plot:

10 out of 10

Characterization:

10 out of 10

Primary Element:

9 out of 10 for its thrill, 10 out of 10 for its mystery

Writing Style:

10 out of 10

Part of a Series: 

Yep, this is Book #9 in the David Raker series. While I have read reviews on Goodreads that say readers enjoyed this as a standalone, they did state that it took a couple chapters to get into it because of not having read the previous books. I’d definitely recommend starting from the first book, but if you’re just looking for an interesting read, this would work as a standalone too. You can find reviews of the previous book on this site too.

Highlighted Takeaway:

You Were Gone will make you question everything you believe about David Raker, leaving you in the same conundrum as the main character, and wondering if you’ve trusted the wrong (fictional) person all these years.

What I Liked:

Raker’s vulnerability and fragility, mentally and emotionally, is depicted really well, making it really easy to associate with him. At the same time, you find yourself questioning what you’ve known so far while also wondering about the truth. The mystery unfolds well, keeping the suspense going even as things get resolved along the way. Overall, the book moves fast, hits hard (emotionally), and keeps you turning the pages late into the night.

What I Didn’t Like:

There was nothing I can point out as having disliked. Like its preceding books, You Were Gone was an incredibly interesting and absorbing read.

Who Should Read It:

Anyone who loves thrillers and mysteries will like Tim Weaver’s work, including You Were Gone and its prequels. The David Raker series remains one of my favorites, book after book.

Who Should Avoid:

If you’re not a fan of mysteries, cold case books, or thrillers, or hate picking up books mid-series, I’d recommend avoiding this one.

Read It For:

The most personal case David Raker has ever found himself in.

As you may have realized by now, I’m definitely going to be finishing the David Raker series soon, finally catching up to the latest releases. I’ve got The Shadow at my Door bought and ready, but will buy and read No One Home prior to starting that (as I would like to go through this series in order).

In the meanwhile, I’m reading other authors (of course!). So stay tuned for more reviews coming up very soon. And as always, thanks for stopping by and checking out the posts on The Book Review Station!

– Rishika

Posted in All Book Reviews, Crime fiction, Mystery, Thrillers

Book Review: The Chase (By Candice Fox)

A big thanks to NetGalley for an ARC of The Chase by Candice Fox. The blurb of the book was really interesting and I got into it as soon as I received the book. So, without further ado, let’s get into what it’s about, what works, what doesn’t, and why you should (or shouldn’t) read this book.

Genre: 

Mystery/Thriller

Length:

432 pages 

Blurb:

John Kradle is on death row for the murder of his wife, son, and sister-in-law. The Supervisor in charge of the row, Celine Osbourne, has always had a special hatred for him. And when a hostage situation leads to all 600 of the Pronghorn Correctional Facility inmates going free, Celine is determined to capture Kradle on priority. But Kradle is determined to stay one step ahead – because this is his last and only chance to prove his innocence. While other departments swoop in to help with one of the biggest manhunts in US history and chase down some of the most dangerous criminals ever captured, Celine and Kradle become entrenched in a game of cat-and-mouse. Is Kradle really innocent? Will Celine’s past keep her from seeing the truth, whatever that may be? And how many innocents will die before the manhunt comes to a successful end?

Overall Rating:

6.5 out of 10

Plot:

7 out of 10

Characterization:

5 out of 10

Primary Element:

9 out of 10 for its mystery; 7 out of 10 for its thrill

Writing Style:

6 out of 10

Part of a Series: 

No. Although, it could become the first of a series.

Highlighted Takeaway:

Candice Fox weaves an engaging tale of how personal demons and traumas can both make and break people, influencing everything big and small that they do.

What I Liked:

The main story – that of John Kradle, Celine Osbourne, and their interactions – was the most interesting part of The Chase. While the rest of the book covered the other criminals’ storylines, with a large part of the book focusing on non-Kradle stuff, the main pitch remained the strongest.

What I Didn’t Like:

While the characterization of Osbourne and Kradle was good (with Kradle’s being better), I found the rest of the characters to be very limited. Plus, some of the characters were incredibly unlikeable and, in my opinion, probably more so than intended. There were so many story arcs that the book couldn’t really get into too much detail of anyone, but at the same time tried to share a lot of information. The end result was that the story seemed very choppy in quite a few places, being more ‘telling’ than ‘showing’.

Who Should Read It:

Anyone who likes manhunt-style stories will definitely enjoy The Chase. You’ll probably also like it if you like the ‘justice seeking vigilante’ stories. I read The Chase without too many breaks – it moved along briskly, kept me engaged, and definitely kept me wanting to discover the truth. In spite of the few issues it had, it was an interesting read and I’d definitely read more from Candice Fox.

Who Should Avoid:

If you don’t like stories that have numerous arcs, multiple storylines, and a few unstable characters, I’d recommend avoiding this one.

Read It For:

A fast-moving, easy-to-read page-turner that is perfect as a travel-time read or to curl up with while the storm rages on outside.

Got any book recommendations for new or old thrillers that you’d like to share? Let us know in the comments below. And, as always, thank you for taking the time to stop by the Book Review Station and read my review!

– Rishika

Posted in All Book Reviews, Mystery, Thrillers

Book Review: Origin (By Dan Brown)

Dan Brown’s Origin seems to leave readers harshly divided. You either hate it or love it. That happens to be true for most of his books, though. I had really enjoyed The Da Vinci Code and Angels and Demons. I remember his other books being alright. They had some good parts and some pretty ridiculous ones.

Origin, though, was a different kind of ‘alright’. And in the interest of sharing all my thoughts (which, I admit, are a bit all over the place), I’m making this review a little different. Read on to know more!

Genre: 

Mystery, Thriller

Length: 

456 pages

Blurb:

Futurist, billionaire, and Robert Langdon’s old student, Edmond Kirsch, is hosting a major announcement at the Guggenheim Museum Bilbao. Langdon and a closely vetted list of exclusive guests have been invited to the event that little is known about but that has promised to “change the world of science and religion forever”. Kirsch’s announcement aims to answer two of human existence’s fundamental questions. But the presentation turns out to be much more controversial than expected, threatening the very foundation of all religion. But Kirsch is assassinated in the moments before his big announcement. As chaos erupts, Langdon finds himself forced to escape Bilbao. With him is the beautiful Ambra Vidal – fiancée of the Crown Prince of Spain and Director of the museum who helped Kirsch put the presentation together. They both attempt to uncover and release Kirsch’s mysterious discovery before it is lost forever. But the man who assassinated Kirsch will stop at nothing to keep the announcement unaired. And that is not the only obstacle in Langdon and Vidal’s way as they traverse the world of enigmatic symbols and modern art… all in an attempt to avenge their dead friend and ensure that his discovery is made public.

Overall Rating:

3 out of 10

The Review:

Let’s jump right into it!

Dan Brown’s Origin is okay at best. It’s really, really slow throughout. Sure there’s some action going on. But the entire premise is how Kirsch would answer two crucial questions:

  • Where did we come from?
  • Where are we going?

Except, because of how often these questions are posed in an attempt to generate excitement in the reader… you simply end up not caring.

I mean, by the time I was a few chapters in, my feelings could be summarized as, “Interesting premise. Too bad I don’t give too much of a damn about finding the answers.”

But!

It does just enough to keep you sort of interested to see it to the end. Which is also a bit of a letdown after all that hype. The book definitely has action – murders, conspiracy, and suspense. But its pace just doesn’t allow you to really get into it. The story itself is okay, with different arcs running in parallel as they often do in dan Brown’s work. It attempts to build a lot of hype as it heads to its climax, only to fall pretty flat. If you’re a big Robert Langdon fan, you might enjoy Origin. Although, if you love the art that the Langdon books focus on, you might want to skip this one, which is based more on modern art.

I’m definitely disappointed at how this turned out, even though I hadn’t gotten into it with high expectations in the first place. It was the first book I picked up in 2022 and was a slow start to the year for sure. But I’ve got other books lined up (and read) so more reviews are definitely coming up soon.

Share your thoughts on Dan Brown, his books, and his characters in the comments below. And as always, thanks for stopping by The Book Review Station and reading this review!

– Rishika

Posted in All Book Reviews, Mystery, Thrillers

Book Review: I Am Missing (By Tim Weaver)

Missing persons investigator, David Raker, returns in I Am Missing. Except, this time, the case he’s presented with is not like anything he’s ever worked on.

I am a big fan of the David Raker series. Its chilling, fast-paced books have always been my ‘comfort reads’. While not all have been great, the series does a fantastic job of keeping the quality of almost every subsequent book as high as its predecessor. So, unsurprisingly, I went into I Am Missing with high expectations. Read on to know if they were met.

Genre:

Thriller

Length:

519 pages 

Blurb:

David Raker is presented with an unusual case – the person who hires him, wants him to find none other than himself. Richard Kite has no memory of who he is or where he came from. Nor of how he ended up beaten and bruised by the shore. The media named him ‘The Lost Man’. He assumed the name ‘Richard Kite’. Months later, in spite of media coverage and police investigations, Kite still has no answers. Which is why he turns to Raker. Now Raker needs to find out just who Kite is, why no one knows or remembers him, and what may connect him to a two-year-old, unsolved murder. As Raker delves deeper into the case, he’s faced with growing threats, and a single question – is Richard Kite a victim… or murderer?

Overall Rating:

10 out of 10

Plot:

10 out of 10

Characterization:

10 out of 10

Primary Element:

10 out of 10 for its thrill and its mystery

Writing Style:

10 out of 10

Part of a Series: 

Yes, this is Book No. 8 in the David Raker series. While the story will probably be an interesting read as a stand-alone, it is best read on order, especially if you really want to know what makes Raker who he is. Reviews for all the previous books in the series are available on the website.

Highlighted Takeaway:

In part wonderfully creepy and in part delightfully suspenseful, I Am Missing offers a unique take on missing-person mysteries that keeps you turning the pages relentlessly.

What I Liked:

The ‘past’ section of the book really gets quite under your skin, giving you the thrill that is typical of Tim Weaver’s work. Combined with the suspense and twist-filled ‘present’, you get a thriller that ties in multiple arcs really well and leaves you guessing until the end. Also, although the book is quite lengthy, it actually moves really quickly, not dragging at any point.

What I Didn’t Like:

There is nothing specific to dislike in I Am Missing. Although a part of it may seem fantastical, it actually provides convincing context.

Who Should Read It:

Anyone who enjoys thrillers set in small towns, and anyone who has read (or not read) any of the Raker books. While it may be best read in order, many first-time Tim Weaver readers have found I Am Missing to be a perfect starting point.

Who Should Avoid:

Anyone who doesn’t enjoy thrillers.

Read It For:

David Raker’s attempt and efforts at solving a case so different from his norm, and so very twisted.

Tim Weaver’s David Raker books continue to remain one of my favorite thriller series. I will definitely be reading the few remaining in the series, and would strongly recommend it to anyone who’s looking for a new thriller/mystery series or just a standalone book or two in the genre.

As always, thank you for stopping by The Book Review Station and reading my review! Got something to share? Drop us a line in the comments section below!

– Rishika

Posted in All Book Reviews, Crime fiction, Mystery

Book Review: Treachery Times Two (By Robert McCaw)

A big thanks to the author, Robert McCaw, and Oceanview Publishing for a free ARC of this book in exchange for an honest review.

Treachery Times Two brings to the forefront one of the biggest ongoing arcs in the Koa Kāne series – Koa’s one mistake that made him who he is, but the revealing of which could take away everything that he’s earned. Does the book do the arc justice? Read on to find out.

Genre: 

Mystery

Length: 

361 pages

Blurb:

Numerous bodies are unearthed in an old, abandoned cemetery when a volcanic earthquake disrupts Hawai’i island. In them is the mutilated body of a woman, unrecognizable, and clearly buried only days ago. Chief Detective Koa Kāne’s investigation into the woman’s death leads him into the world of a politically connected defense contractor, an incredibly powerful and secret military weapon – Deimos, and an FBI espionage investigation. Forced to defy his Chief of Police in his search for justice for the victim, Kāne faces a new threat – that of his thirty-year-old secret being revealed. Years ago, Kāne had killed his father’s nemesis – the man who’d been responsible for Kāne’s father’s death – and covered up the murder. Now, the grandson of the dead man has arrived, and Koa is forced to investigate the homicide he had committed. Until another man is falsely accused of the murder. Can Koa stand by and watch an innocent man pay for his crime? Or will he accept his guilt before everyone, losing the chance to find justice for the mutilated, forgotten woman, and losing the woman he loves, the respect he’s earned, and everything he has ever held dear?

Overall Rating:

9 out of 10

Plot:

10 out of 10

Characterization:

10 out of 10

Primary Element:

10 out of 10 for its mystery

Writing Style:

9 out of 10

Part of a Series: 

Yes. This is Book No. 4 in the Koa Kāne series. The books are connected and are best read in order, but can be enjoyed as standalone-s too. Check out the review for Book No. 1, Death of a Messenger, here, and Book No. 3, Fire and Vengeance, here.

Highlighted Takeaway:

Even better than its prequels, Treachery Times Two brings everything you’ve come to love about the Koa Kāne series – mystery, culture, and characterization – and ups the ante.

What I Liked:

There were three things that I liked the most in Treachery Times Two:

  1. It’s got the perfect mix of culture and story, with neither outshining the other.
  2. It showcases Koa Kāne in his rawest, most human form – flawed yet morally strong.
  3. It has multiple storylines and brings them all together perfectly.

What I Didn’t Like:

There is nothing I can say I actively disliked in the book. I found it to be even better than the earlier books in the series (except for Book No. 2, which I am yet to read), and feel that it’s set the bar higher for the series.

Who Should Read It:

If you like mysteries, especially those that have multi-layered plots, you’ll definitely enjoy Treachery Times Two and other Koa Kāne books.

Who Should Avoid:

I don’t think anyone would really dislike this book, unless you absolutely do not enjoy mysteries.

Read It For:

Koa Kāne’s ultimate test – professional and personal. And the always-enthralling representation of Hawaiian culture.

Treachery Times Two releases in January 2022 – pre-order it from most online bookstores or Amazon.

Got questions or something to share about Robert McCaw’s Koa Kāne series or Treachery Times Two? Drop a comment below! And as always, thanks for stopping by The Book Review Station and reading this review!

– Rishika

Posted in All Book Reviews, Crime fiction, Mystery, Thrillers

Book Review: Every Last Fear (By Alex Finlay)

Every Last Fear by Alex Finlay sounded like the perfect book that brought together mystery, thriller, and true-crime documentaries (especially around wrongful convictions). It took me around four days to read the book – which is quite long at 368 pages – because it definitely manages to hold the reader’s interest (and I had a long weekend!). So what’s good, what’s bad, and what’s unputdownable about it? Read on to know.

Genre: 

Mystery, Thriller

Length: 

368 pages

Blurb:

Seven years ago, Matt Pine’s elder brother, Danny, had been convicted of the murder of his teenaged girlfriend. Danny swore innocence. His parents and younger sister stood by him and so did the rest of the country as they followed the case – portrayed as one of wrongful conviction – in a viral true-crime documentary. Matt didn’t know what to believe because he saw something the night that made him suspect his brother’s guilt. Now a student at NYU, Matt is trying to pick up the pieces of the life left in the aftermath of the documentary that villainized the town, forced his family out of the city, and drove a wedge between him and his father who had centered his life around proving Danny’s innocence. Until he wakes up after a night of partying to learn that most of his family – his parents, younger sister, and kid brother – were dead, killed in an accidental gas leak when taking a rare holiday in Mexico. Numb and shocked, Matt is forced to face the past as he attempts to bring his family’s bodies back home and give them a proper funeral. But as suspicions surrounding his family’s death arise, the past and present crash… and Matt is left fighting for his own life and facing hidden fears. When the truth behind his family’s deaths, his brother’s conviction, and behind what he saw that night finally surfaces, will Matt, Danny, and the Pine family receive their redemption… or will it destroy them and their memories forever?

Overall Rating:

7 out of 10

Plot:

8 out of 10

Characterization:

8 out of 10

Primary Element:

9 out of 10 for its mystery, 6 out of 10 for its thrill

Writing Style:

8 out of 10

Part of a Series: 

No. (Could be in the future given that one of the main characters has a lot of potential to become a leading protagonist in their own series.)

Highlighted Takeaway:

Emotional, Insightful, and a Page-turner Every Last Fear successfully maintains the mystery and keeps the reader guessing.

What I Liked:

If you’ve read enough mysteries and thrillers, you learn to pick up on the subtle clues. But Every Last Fear doesn’t let that happen. It takes a while before you figure out the primary mystery, and the many other smaller ones unfolding alongside. The main characters really shine in all their glory and all their darkness – their flawed but hopeful outlook making them seem very human and very relatable. There also exists an idealistic outlook – the author normalizes choices, expression, and actions that are otherwise only part of ongoing social issue debates. Seeing these matters as a ‘given’ was just… really nice!

What I Didn’t Like:

The story is told from the point of view of multiple characters and over past and present periods, which takes some getting used to. There are also quite a few references to Linkin Park and other pop culture, which was good, but at times came across as a little forced. These issues are easy enough to get over though, and a few chapters in, you can get easily find yourself engrossed.

Who Should Read It:

Anyone who likes mysteries and thrillers will enjoy Every Last Fear. You’ll also really enjoy it if you like true-crime shows, especially The Staircase or The Innocent Man.

Who Should Avoid:

If you don’t like violence at all, I would recommend avoiding this one. It’s not got a lot of it, but the amount it has is hard-hitting.

Read It For:

A fast-paced, well-layered mystery that definitely manages to surprise.

One of the things that Every Last Fear by Alex Finlay touches upon is the effect of a true-crime documentary on the persons that the documentary covers. The documentaries that are famous on Netflix and other platforms don’t always show the after-effects of their airing on the people concerned, and this take on the matter, although fictional, was definitely interesting. I found the highlighted issues about the justice system easy to believe and accept as fact because of the many true-crime documentaries that have brought to light similar matters. These are problems that need to change, and it’s interesting to see more work – fictional and non-fictional – being dedicated to their awareness.

Love true-crime documentaries or thrillers? Share your thoughts on your favorites in the comments below. And as always, thanks for stopping by and reading my review. Coming up next… a review of either The Zookeeper’s Wife by Diane Ackerman or Broken Heart by Tim Weaver.

– Rishika

Posted in All Book Reviews, Crime fiction, Mystery

Book Review: Salvation of a Saint (By Keigo Higashino)

The first book of Keigo Higashino that I ever read was The Devotion of Suspect X (the English translation). And I have recommended it to everyone since (review here). So when I picked up Salvation of a Saint (I just couldn’t resist picking this over the other options), I had a lot of expectations. Read on to know how it (finally) went!

Genre:

Mystery

Length:

330 pages 

Blurb:

Yoshitaka Mashida is on the verge of divorcing his wife. But before he can do so, he dies of being posioned by arsenic-laced coffee. His wife, Ayane Mashiba, becomes the prime suspect. Except for one problem – she was hundreds of miles away the day that Yoshitaka was murdered. When Detective Kusanagi begins his investigation, he faces an unexpected challenge – he is smitten with the prime suspect and believes her to be innocent. But Junior Detective Kaoru Utsumi holds onto her belief that Ayane is guilty. Their difference of opinion, however, turns out to be the smallest of their problems in a case that becomes increasingly unsolvable as it unfolds. And so, Utsumi does what her boss has always done in such tough situations – she turns to Kusanagi’s brilliant friend, Professor Manabu Yukawa, known by the Tokyo Police as Detective Galileo. Will Yukawa be able to help Utsumi and his friend solve another seemingly unsolvable case? Or has he finally met his match in Yoshitaka Mashiba’s killer?

Overall Rating:

9 out of 10

Plot:

10 out of 10

Characterization:

10 out of 10

Primary Element:

10 out of 10 for its mystery

Writing Style:

10 out of 10

Part of a Series:

Yes. Salvation of a Saint is the second English-translated book in the Detective Galileo books, although it stands at #5 in the original (Japanese) series. It can easily, however, be read as a standalone or even as a starting point of the series.

Highlighted Takeaway:

Salvation of a Saint is unputdownable with twists that keep you guessing and questioning your earlier guesses, before coming to a brilliant and satisfying end – simple, but deadly!

What I Liked:

The cultural aspects were really beautiful. They give you so much insight into a completely different culture than what you may be used to if you usually read crime thrillers and mysteries from North America or the U.K.

The writing style is beautifully simple, and equally impactful. I just could not keep this one down and took every opportunity I got to read a few pages.

The representation of gender equality (in, I am given to assume, a male-dominated culture) while still being able to showcase (and celebrating) the strengths of each gender.

Lastly – the story. Keigo Higashino continuously manages to create complex stories that are simply presented. In fact, in both of his books that I’ve read, I’ve always started with wondering how he can stretch out and add mystery to something that seems obvious. And yet, he repeatedly does just that, leaving you with a sense of deep satisfaction when the mystery is finally solved.

What I Didn’t Like:

There was nothing that I really disliked about Salvation of a Saint, but I did feel like it fell just under The Devotion of Suspect X in my list of preferences. It was great but not as phenomenal as the latter.

Who Should Read It:

Anyone who loves a good mystery. You should especially give Keigo Higashino’s books a shot if you like/liked Agatha Christie novels and other whodunits.

Who Should Avoid:

Anyone who doesn’t enjoy a good whodunit-style mystery.

Read It For:

A writing style that manages to highlight some of the most terrible aspects of people and humanity with simplicity that seems to be right at odds with the heinousness, and that yet manages to perfectly encapsulate it.

Share your thoughts on Keigo Higashino, Salvation of a Saint, or any of his other works in the comments below. Recommendations for similar books are very welcome! Coming up next… either a review of Tim Weaver’s Broken Heart or Nir Eyal’s Hooked.

As always, thanks for stopping by and reading my review!

– Rishika

Posted in All Book Reviews, Mystery, Science fiction

Book Review: Friend Request (By David Wailing)

Friend RequestSource: Goodreads
Friend Request
Source: Goodreads

Length: 69 pages

My rating: 3 out of 5 stars

It’s a party in celebration of Nick and Larissa’s tenth wedding anniversary and the purchase of their new house. But Nick can’t concentrate on anything other than his search for one man – one unknown man whose auto sent his auto a friend request, the man whose status said that he’s dating Nick’s wife. The story unfolds at a party in a futuristic world. And the question that everyone wants answered… Who is this stranger and why is the mask of fidelity slowly slipping from the face of the woman that Nick has always loved?

My take:

Good read. The entire concept of autos is fascinating and terrifying at the same time… something, I’m sure, that raises the neck hairs of all those who are afraid of machines taking over humans! The nature of human beings has been shown wonderfully – friendship, love, jealousy, secrets, anger, prestige and true nature displaying reactions!
The style of writing was a bit haphazard but not so much that it would hinder the flow of the story. Its short length makes it a quick and very enjoyable read.
All in all, an interesting concept and one on which I would read more books for sure.

– Rishika